best podcasting tools

Episode Description

There are lots of aspects to the podcasting process that can take more time or be more manual than you would like them to – and that’s where many software developers have come to the rescue to build tools that actually simply your podcasting workflow.

This tools are of course not MUST HAVES and you can run a successful show without investing into any of these, however if you run a business which the majority of you do, then your time is often very limited and many of these tools will help you to simply get things done better and faster.

I am taking a deep dive into how I am using those tools within this episode and here are the tools we’ll be talking about (*these are affiliate links).

 

You're listening to podcasting for experts with honest conversations about using podcasting as a tool to grow your reach, increase your audience, make a positive impact on the world, and most importantly, to get paid for your efforts. I'm your host, Jess, and we are pristine podcasts. Let's talk podcasting. Hey, everyone, and welcome back. This is season two, episode three. And today we're going to be talking about the back end of your podcast. And we're going to dive into our favourite tools that we use to plan, organise and promote the show, either our own show or our clients shows. Before we dive into these tools, I wanted to say that really, there is no need for you to sign up for any of these tools, I'm very aware of the fact that you can have a very successful podcast without using any of these. These are simply tools that we have found helpful, and that have saved us an awful lot of time. And we have gotten to the stage where we value our time, way more than we're valuing making a small investment in something that can save us hours every single week. A second disclaimer that I want to make is that the links that I will give you in these episodes, not all of them, but some of them are affiliate links. And we do receive a commission for recommending those products, we do have a strict rule that if we don't approve a tool, or we've never used it, we don't recommend it. So you can trust on the fact that the things that we're recommending to you on this show, they actually work and they bring us a lot of value. So before we go into dive into the actual tools that I want to talk about today, I want to make a quick detour and talk about the difference between a system and a tool because I see these two confused all the time, and they're really not the same thing. So let's take a quick look at the definitions for both of those terms. And then we'll see how this applies to what we're talking today. So a system is a set of principles or procedures according to which something is done an organised scheme or a method. A tool is a device or an implement, especially one held in the hand used to carry out a particular function. So in the last solo episode I did which was episode one, we talked about the process of designing your podcasting workflow. If you missed it, go and listen to that one. In that episode, what we discuss is a system systems can be implemented in lots of different ways. And what works for one person or one team does not work for another. Lots of systems can even be done. And you know, just with pen and paper, you don't even need to be using any specific tool for that. What we're talking about today, though, is tools, tools are simply going to make it slightly easier or maybe faster, to implement the system that you have developed. Some tools are free, and they're a good starting point. And some of them are paid and they're just slightly better, have slightly better features or save you slightly more time or allow you to have more users in the account, etc. So now that we've covered that, I want to dive into the individual tools that we use ourselves on our show or with our clients. We're going to start all the way at the back of the podcasting process with the aspects that so many podcasters have told us that they struggle with and that his promotion, promotion. And building a community around your show is super important when it comes to podcasting, because that is what allows you to make a deeper connection with your audience, as well as continuously bringing people back to your show time and time again. And there are a few ways in which you can do that. One of those ways is email marketing. building an email list is something that many podcasters never even think about, particularly if you're not an online business owner. But you know, you've just kind of come across podcasting and you thought you would give this a try. The thing that you have to understand is that when you do a podcast, and you don't build up an audience by building an email list, you actually have no way of contacting your listeners, other than putting out a podcast episode or interacting with them on social media. So if Facebook or should I say if meta decides to buy all of the podcasting platforms and buy everything else that's out there on the interwebs and then they basically decided to cancel your account. You would have absolutely no way of being in touch with your audience that you've potentially painstakingly built over years. And this is something That happens quite regularly that people just get their entire social media accounts across multiple platforms suspended. And if the only way for you to be in touch with your audience is via someone else's real estate, then you have a problem. And that's why we recommend having an email list and place that you can reach out to when, you know, something happens on other platforms. But that's not the only reason why we want to have an email list. It's not just about, you know, having a backup, it's actually also about being able to reach your audience with your new content directly in their inbox, and then being able to continuously bring them back to your show. Because actually, something interesting that I understood over a period of time, is that if a podcast is not growing and listening numbers, it doesn't always mean that you're not promoting enough, it could mean that you're not promoting enough. Or it could mean that actually, people do find your show, however, they listen to one or two episodes, and then they don't stick around after that, because there isn't anything of value for them to get. So it could be that you don't actually have a problem with promotion, you have a problem with retention. And that's where your email list comes in. So when you have, let's say, a list of 500 subscribers, who've all listened to your podcast, every time a new podcast episode comes out, you are able to actually send them an email and bring them back to listen to your next episode. Personally, my favourite tool for email marketing is ConvertKit. Because they're made for creators, they make it super easy to create all of the forms that you need to send automated emails. And they also allow you to monetize your audience through product sales, recurring subscriptions, and they've recently introduced a tip jar, where you can literally just include a link in your emails and let your audience support you. They do offer a two week free trial, and you can sign up anytime at pristine podcast.com forward slash ConvertKit. They've recently also introduced another new pricing plan that makes it super affordable. So I think after 300 subscribers at the moment, they're free. And of course, this is going to change as we go. But then the paid plans start at $9 a month. And there's now a new $15 a month plan that includes automation. So that is freaking amazing, because it brings the cost of the tool down to a level where it's way more affordable for people who are new creators who haven't monetize the audience yet. Anyone that does sign up under our affiliate link, or will receive my ConvertKit training videos and checklists to help you get set up in no time, I will reach out manually to everyone that purchases under my link. And I'll send them directly to you so that you have the easiest start that you can potentially have. The second part to promotion, other than email marketing is building a community. I know lots of people, particularly recently that have gotten quite fed up with Facebook, Facebook is the easiest way for you to build a community around your podcast provided that your audience is actually using Facebook, which most people at least have an account and sign in now and again. But if your audience isn't that keen on Facebook, or if you're just not enjoying being on Facebook, and you're trying to limit the time that you spend on that platform, then you may want to look at hosting your community on a platform such as mighty networks, where you don't just get the community features. But you can also set up courses and events in the same space. And it requires just less fuss with different tools. And it's a great way for you to be able to provide a platform where your audience can have conversations not just with you, but also with each other on the topic that they're feeling so passionately about. I have links directly to mighty networks from pristine podcast comm forward slash mighty dash networks. So if you want to check it out, head that way. Now another thing that we are constantly doing, that takes up an awful lot of time is posting on social media. And there are lots of tools out there that let you send posts to Facebook or Twitter to Instagram and I don't need to mention them all because you probably have heard of Buffer, Hootsuite and Sprout Social and Agora Pulse and whatever. So there's like a whole pile of them out there. But something that those tools don't do very easily. That's actually a huge missed opportunity. Seeing how quickly content moves in this day and age is that they're not very good at recycling social media content. Like if you have turned one episode into four different audio grammes that you're sharing You might use those tools to schedule them once or when a new episode comes out. And then that's it. So you've created this piece of content, but it's actually not doing any more work for you. And that's not really an efficient way to be using your content. On Facebook, your Facebook page has a very, very, very little reach these days, you know. And it could be that with every post that you post, maybe only 10, or 15% of your audience are actually seeing that post on Twitter, you know, every couple of minutes, your tweet would have moved so far down, you know, the line in between all of the new tweets coming in that again, the majority of your audience will probably never see it, you know, I found that the only platform where I don't tend to repost content, just because it is so visual, and so obvious is Instagram. But on all the other platforms, I find it super useful once you've built up a large enough content library, to simply have a tool that recycles your old posts, you know, so once every two months, every single episode that you've created, gets shared again and again and again. And again. So that new people who haven't been in your audience, or people who've just missed that post, are able to see that one as well. So you're kind of making your content work harder for yourself. A tool that allows you to do that and does it very, very, very nicely is Meet Edgar, and you can find them at pristine podcast.com forward slash Meet Edgar. In Meet Edgar, you'll basically be creating content buckets, that content libraries, following either specific themes that you have. Or, you know, you could have one for quotes from your podcast episode, one bucket, four audio grammes, and you can divvy up your content by the type of content that you create. And then you simply tell Edgar, how often you want to repost an item from one of your content categories. And when it's supposed to post that and to which platform. So you have complete control over how often which content is recycled and sees the light of day. And that can save you hours. And it makes really, really, really good use of your existing content. So I would definitely recommend that you check it out. That is, for me a luxury tool, not an essential tool like ConvertKit. To me as more like an essential tool. Meathead. God is like a nice to have if you have the budget, I think they started like around 50 bucks a month. So definitely not cheap. But I have to say, once you have a huge content library, you can make your existing content work so much harder, meaning that you have to put less active hours into creating new content every single week. So yeah, definitely a luxury item. But we'll save you hours upon hours. The next part of the podcasting process that I want to talk about because I spent so much time on it is a notetaking script planning and organising. One tool that I absolutely love for keeping all of my notes organised and not losing them all the time, which I'm really good at is motion. Lotion is an app that provides you with different components like notes, databases, Kanban, boards, wikis, Calendars, Reminders. And as a user, you can connect these components to create your own system. And you can manage your knowledge, manage different pieces of information and take notes, manage different data, project management, whatever you want to do. So technically, you can manage your entire podcasting workflow inside notion. I personally don't do that just because I work with a bigger team as well as our clients. So I need a little bit more power on the project management front. So we use Asana to manage our podcasts and our clients podcasts. But what I do use notion of for is all of the planning for my business for home for writing out the Episode notes to handle the creative side of the podcast, I add all the info for my guest experts in there. So I have everything in one place when it comes to recording. And it's way more convenient for me than to use Google Docs for example, because I always spend ages looking through the different folders in Google Drive to try and find the things that I need to just quickly write an intro for an episode for an interview that I've already recorded, and it takes too long and that's why I love motion. Hey, are you spending hours extra editing every other week? Because you forgot to do things like switching off your aircon or moving the dog outside of the house? Did you secure an amazing guest interview only to then forget to press record? Or maybe your guest forgot to press record and now you have to work with a really low quality backup recording. Do you want to batch your show and finally get ahead but you can't for the life of you remember what's already done and what's not. Don't worry, this is really normal. There are way more steps involved in running a successful high quality podcast than meets the eye. And it's really easy to forget something here and there. But let's be realistic. If you really want to grow your show, you can't carry on like this. If you want to design a podcasting workflow that works, then grab a podcast workflow blueprint. Now, you'll get immediate access to our entire podcast workflow that we've been using with all of our clients for months. The Blueprint contains a video training that explains exactly how our system works, the Trello board template that you can just plug into your account or transfer to your platform of choice, the fully customizable template episode workflows, guest email swipes. And as a bonus, the guest booking automation video training, you can check it all out and get your copy at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. And now back to the episode for most people unless you need to get your team in the account as well notion is actually free to use. And you can sign up at notion dot s o warning, there is a steeper learning curve. Just because it is so plain yet so powerful, that you can basically build any kind of system that you want to build. And it's not for everyone in that sense. I am thinking maybe later on next year, I can bring you some custom lotion templates, because I know lots of people that love using it. So let me know if you'd be interested in that. And then I can always build one specifically for the purpose that you're looking for. I've already mentioned that for daily organisation, I can't rely on notion because I really need the main focus of the tool that I'm using to be more project management tip. So we as a team and with our clients use Asana to manage all of the podcasting workflows, we do use that Kanban board layout exactly, as I've shown it in the podcast workflow blueprint, we just don't use it inside Trello. But inside Asana because there's a couple of features that are way better in Asana, in my opinion, and in Trello. And those are the recurring tasks as well as the notifications. And because we do so much work not just for us, but also for our clients. And also for, you know, publishing and marketing, I really need there to be a more powerful tool in that department. Again, Asana has a free plan, which is actually more than what we need within our team, so we've not had the need to upgrade. So if you want to take a look at that, you can just find them@asana.com. Now something that I sometimes struggle with, that I am not too good at is organising my day itself, I have a habit of under estimating the amount of time some things that I have to do will take and overestimate the amount of hours that I have available in the day and the amount of energy that I have. So I'll sit there in the mornings at like six, and I'll think, Oh, great, you know, I have from like 6am to 6pm to get work done today. But I forget that I have a two hour team meeting from one to three and from 12 to one we'll be eating and then from five to six, I have another call. And then actually I thought I had 12 hours, but I actually only have eight hours. And I'll probably be quite tired from those meetings. So the three hours I did have in the afternoons, I'm not really capable to be creative, because I'm kind of drained from the day already. So actually creative, productive hours, I only have like three, but I scheduled 12 hours worth of creative productive tasks like recording podcast episodes. So that is something that I do all the time. And it's causing me to way overload myself. And then I have like, I don't know, I'll get to Saturday, and I'll be like, I need to just lay down and not do anything. And I don't really like that. So I've recently discovered a handy little tool called some summer. And some sama grabs all of your tasks from Asana, which obviously I use with the team from Trello, which I have a client that uses it and I'm in there, from Gmail from slack and from all the other places. And it then asks you to estimate how long that work will actually take. Then you define when your day starts on that day and when your day ends, and then it will pull in appointments from your Google Calendar. And then it requires you to literally put the tasks on the days timeline in the order that you're going to do them. And then you will see that actually you don't have enough hours in the day once you've added some you know one hour of buffer time in the mornings and one hour of buffer time in the afternoons for the stuff that obviously takes longer that you under estimated summer will warn you it will literally say hey you unrealistic workload, and then it requires you to defer tasks to the following day. And I really, really, really, really like that. Also it lets you set your weekly priorities so I can say hey, this week I want to finish all the organisation for Black Friday. I want to work on my email follow ups, and I want to work on a third thing. So it will actually give you a report at the end of the week, how much time did you really work on the things that were game changers for your podcast, or your business or your life as a whole in that week, and you'll be surprised that you'll maybe spend five or 10% of your time, when you first start doing this on the stuff that's really going to move the needle. And the rest of the time. It's just stuff that you need to get done. So I found that very, very, very interesting. And I have linked out to them from pristine podcast.com forward slash Sun Sama, that's s um, S A N A. So do check them out. I would love to know what you think I found it super useful. But yeah, I could see that not everyone maybe needs that level of organisation. The next thing that I want to talk about that takes an awful lot of time when it comes to podcast organisation and planning his guest booking. So there's nothing worse to me than doing what I like to call the email tango. Oh, yes. We would love to have you as a guest on the show call. When can we do the interview? How about next week Tuesday? No, I can't do Tuesdays, I can do Wednesday. Okay, what time? Well, what timezone are you actually in all right, and then days go by doing this email tango, and it's a big headache for everyone involved. And then the person can't make it after all. And then you kind of repeat the tango a second time, because now you have to reschedule. So if you're still manually booking your interviews, I want to introduce you to a tool called Calendly. Calendly connects your existing Google or Apple Outlook calendar, it checks when you're actually available. And then it allows people to book themselves in for specific appointment slots in your calendar, when it is convenient for them. And when you are available, boom. So you cut out all this email back and forth, you literally just create an appointment type called podcast interview, you set the length for the length that it should be, and then you connect it to your calendar. So it will automatically check for available slots, when you want to be doing the interviews, you can say, hey, I'm only available for interviews Monday, Wednesday, Friday, from five to 7pm, you can tell Calendly those restrictions, and then you just send that link to your guests. Your guest clicks the link opens your calendar finds the time and books themselves in and it's all done within like five minutes, you literally don't have to do anything. The other useful thing that you can do with Calendly is that you can send all of the information that your podcast guests need to have automatically at the time of booking. So it cuts the administrative load of your podcast guests to absolutely zero. And because it will send them regular reminders before the interview comes up. It will also hugely reduce no shows. So I don't know, I don't know what we're doing without Calendly. Like it literally runs everything for us. And I love it. You can check them out at pristine podcast.com forward slash Calendly. Now, another aspect of the podcasting process is obviously recording and editing. Now, we are podcast editors. So we personally use Adobe Audition for editing. But I know that not everyone has the capacity to learn a new tool. And not everyone is particularly fussy about the quality of the edits. So if you don't have the budget to outsource, can't figure out how to do it yourself and you value speed over quality, then I would recommend that you check out the script for editing. So to me, it is still better that you go and edit your show with the script if you can't learn how to do it yourself. And if you don't want to or can't afford to outsource it, it's still better if you use the script than to just not edit it at all and leave all of the kind of ramble inside of your episodes. So what can the script do for you, you can basically run your entire podcasting workflow inside the script, so you can actually record and edit your episode right inside the tool. And then it has a built in transcription tool. And you can also collaborate with your team members on the actual episode. So how do you edit in the script, the script will basically transcribe your entire podcast episode and then instead of editing the audio, you basically edit the text of the episode and the script will then go and make the corrections. It is definitely far from perfect, it will leave some pretty dodgy cuts at times. But if you don't have the budget and you don't have the nerve to learn it yourself, it works well enough for starters until you can get someone else on board that can help you. You can find them at pristine podcast.com forward slash descript. Now there's a few other tools that I want to mention that have been really really really useful if you do have team members and you need a way to communicate with then I would strongly recommend that you check out slack, you can find them@slack.com. It's basically instant messaging for work. It saves you from having to have your contractors phone numbers or needing to talk to people on WhatsApp, which is really not super useful for work communications. In slack, you can DM your team members directly, or you can collaborate on projects with multiple team members by using channels. Slack now also offers audio and video messaging. So there is literally no more need to be sending people a load of loom videos all the time. I do, however, think that that might be limited to the paid plans only. Because our team is quite small, we run the free plan for slack. And I have not had the audio and video features added to our account. So I think that is a paid plan only, but Lumas paid now as well. I mean beyond 25 videos. So if you are recording a lot of live videos and you're paying for it, then you might be able to use Slack instead of loom. Another tool that we get a lot of use out of is otter.ai. For transcripts, I've linked out to them at pristine podcast.com forward slash author. So when it comes to transcripts, you have multiple options, you can either sit there and listen to the episode and transcribe it all yourself, which will take I don't know three, four times as long as the episode or you can use a service like rev.com to run your transcripts, but they're charging $1.25 a minute. And that is quite pricey. If you're doing you know, for one hour podcast episodes a month, that's a decent chunk of money to pay for transcripts. And to me, in the beginning, that is not worth it. There is the service called otter. Otter will create a automated machine generated transcript from your episodes. So how well it works really depends on your speech and your accent. So I think you get about 6000 minutes on the Pro Plan which must be around 10 or 12 bucks a month or something like that. I mean, prices change all the time. So at the time of recording, it must be around 12 bucks, I think. So we use those transcripts as a baseline for actual corrected transcripts. So we're kind of doing a balance of machine and then for a human to go in and tidy that app and make it actually usable and to also optimise it for search terms a little bit. Now another thing that you may need to generate for the promotion of your podcast episodes are audiograms. So there are these little videos that just have like, for example, the cover image of the podcast and then these sound waves that are moving. As someone is speaking, I use Buzzsprout for a podcast hosting. And they actually have a very, very simple audio Graham feature built in. However, I really don't love it, it's quite limited makes the end result look a bit ugly. And sometimes it messes up the colours of the graphics. So whenever we do this for clients, I end up actually using Wave. And I absolutely love it like it is way more intuitive to use. And the end result is beautiful. And on brand and not slightly off. However, you always have to balance these things with, I guess with the revenue that your podcast is generating and the time that you're spending on doing it. So if you do want to step up your promotion, and you want to have some better looking audio grammes, then definitely check out wav. The link is at pristine podcast.com forward slash WAV and it's W A, vv. And the last tool that I want to mention just because I have talked to three people this month, at least that I've mentioned it to that have never heard of either of the two is Patreon and buy me a coffee. So the easiest way to start with monetizing your show is to simply ask your audience for a donation. I know lots of people feel super, super uncomfortable about that they think you know, it's like as if I'm begging and all that good stuff. The thing is, it's really not. So when people work as a waitress, for example, they will get a base salary. And then people will give them a tip if they've received particularly good service. Now some of your audience members might be paying you to be receiving services, and others may just want to leave a tip as a thank you for this really, really, really useful free piece of content that you created. And they just want to show their appreciation. So instead of seeing these donations like a whole lot, please help me I'm struggling so much. Really frame it and see it as an Hey, if you enjoyed this and you want to show your appreciation, you can do so by making a donation to our cause our mission, our show our whatever it is over here, and then just tell them where to go. And the people who don't want to make a donation, guess what they're going to do nothing. And the people who do want to make a donation and who are grateful for what you're doing, they'll make a donation and you'll have earned some money. Okay? The easiest way to get started is buy me a coffee. Because buy me a coffee allows people to make one off donations, okay, so it's literally just like a tip jar, you just have people drop some money in it. And that's it. Thank you very much. The other platform that allows you to monetize your audience in that way is Patreon. However, in Patreon, you create multiple levels of support that people can give you. And they can decide to example, donate you five bucks every single month. And in exchange, patreon supporters would normally get some kind of exclusive benefit that you would only be able to get if you support the show on Patreon. And they're usually monthly recurring payments rather than one off payments. So that's why I said, if you're just looking to get started with this, use, buy me a coffee because there people can make one off donations. And if you're already fully in the swing of things, creating content, you have a community built up and you know exactly what your audience wants more of, then switch over to getting some monthly supporters on Patreon. Because if you're still overwhelmed with putting out podcast episodes regularly, you don't really want to have the stress of worrying about what bonus content are you going to make for two patreon supporters to pay you two bucks a month, you know, because you're not getting paid enough to justify investing that much time into it. So you have to kind of balance it out a little bit. All right. So those were my top favourite tools that I like to use for podcasting. There are so so so many more tools that we're using either ourselves or with our clients and that are saving us tonnes of time and hassle. But for now, these are the ones that I really wanted to share with you today because I think the majority of people can benefit from them. I will be doing some separate episodes like this in future where we're talking about more specific aspects of the podcasting process, such as community building, or marketing. And then I can showcase more of the other service providers out there like Canva, or Napoleon, cat or circle or etc. Right. I hope you have heard of some new tools today that you may not have been familiar with yet. And I'd love to know if you've discovered any that you're going to start using for your show. So do find us over on Instagram at pristine podcast and tell me if there's any tool that you can't wait to get signed up for. Already. That's it for me for this episode. If you enjoyed the show our entire team would appreciate if you leave us a review. And if you'd like to be a guest on the podcast or if you'd like to talk about collaborations then please drop us an email any time you'll find our email address in the show notes. As always, I hope you have an amazing day. And I'll see you for the next month. That's it for this episode. Thank you so much for listening. We really appreciate you. If you're ready to step out of overwhelm. Then don't forget to check out the podcast workflow blueprint at Christine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. The link is also in the show notes best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools. best podcasting tools.

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