personal finance expert

Episode Description

In this episode we are talking to Podcaster and Personal Finance Expert Debra Jacobs about her journey and her experiences with podcasting.

About Debra Jacobs

My previous work life includes founding and operating a preschool for many years, where I taught, supervised staff, developed curriculum, coached parents, and ran the business. Prior to starting the preschool, I worked at a non-profit, where I wrote grants, fund-raised, and helped immigrants and refugees prepare for life and work in the United States. I’m a single mom to two young adult daughters.

A summa cum laude graduate of Clark University, where I received highest honors in English, I also hold an Ed.M. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. I am currently working towards AFC certification through the AFCPE.

You're listening to podcasting for experts with honest conversations about using podcasting as a tool to grow your reach, increase your audience, make a positive impact on the world, and most importantly, to get paid for your efforts. I'm your host, Jess, and we are pristine podcasts. Let's talk podcasting. Hi, Debra, thank you so much for joining us on the show today, I just thank you so much for having me, I really appreciate it. You're very welcome. I appreciate it that people come on when something is early, because we're doing the interviews for season two, and it's been something I've been wanting to do. And then I'm like, Oh, who's gonna come on the podcast when it's new. And I'm like, this is always, you know, hard to find people who really want to join. So I do really appreciate that. And I like to prepare for all of the episodes. And when I checked on your website, we have something in common, that's actually something a little bit odd. Okay, yes, I read that you were running a preschool I did for 18 years. That is. So what happened was, I'm a single mom by choice. And when my older daughter was two, I just felt the need to spend more time with her. So I ended up quitting a job that I had had for many years in a nonprofit, and opening this childcare programme. And, you know, at first, it was very hard, just because I thought, Oh, it was in my home. And it ended up being in a separate part of my home. That was very much a school, but my commute was still walking down my stairs rather than, you know, going somewhere else. And for my daughter, I thought she would love being home with mom, and she would have if she wasn't home with mom with a bunch of other kids. So at first, it was really hard. But it ended up being such a good thing to do over so many years, as a single mom, it was a way for me to do work, I really loved and to be there when my kids got home from school and to you know, have other teachers take over in the afternoon. So I could do other things and take my kids to activities and didn't never made me rich, but it worked really well for our lives. It does. The interesting thing about daycare is that people always because of the prices assume that you know, you must be rolling in the dough. But honestly, after having run a daycare centre, I just know that a lot of the times the bills that they pile up thick and fast, you know, wages, insurances for people and then resources. And if you ever have to replace the chair, and you realise the chair ends up costing, like 250 bucks to like seat one baby at the table. It doesn't compare? Absolutely, by the time I paid my teachers pay taxes for my teachers paid my expenses in terms of supplies, and, you know, a lot of expenses. So yeah, yeah, I got that. So that's what I was doing beforehand. And I think I get always the most random feedback because people that know me now they're like, oh, what you used to work at daycare. And I was like, yes. But then I kind of, I worked my way all the way to the top. And then I still I was living in London at the time. And to be honest, there was nothing left at the end of the month, they get paid all my bills, my rent, ate, like, I don't know, half of my pay. And yeah, I was never gonna get anywhere, I was literally never going to end up doing the things I wanted to do travelling the places I wanted to go to. I was like, I'm stuck here, basically. And then there wasn't a growth pathway. So once you'd become manager, you could go working for the local authorities and being like an area manager and stuff like that. But to be honest, those jobs have been cut by now because the government doesn't want to pay for the education. So it's very sad, you know, the way that teachers in general are looked at and early childhood educators in particular, in the United States a little bit different where a growth path could have been opening a private preschool and then if you really want it to grow maybe a string of private preschools but that wasn't a direction I wanted to go in. Yeah, it's something that takes a lot of responsibility as well. I have to say like it the centre I was at had 70 full time places and then We had parents where there were times where they couldn't afford to pay their bill like things have been very tight. And then they've come in with allegations against teachers that they've hurt their children to get out of paying the bill because they're trying to leave. And, you know, I haven't actually slept because when you register for a daycare centre in the UK, you are the registered personnel, though you are not the owner, you are the person that has daily responsibility for what happens to the children, and you are the designated safeguarding person. And so it was all of that on my shoulder for 24,000 pounds a year. And I was like, I'm not paying anything for this, like, I can't, I can't live like that. So I got very frustrated. And then I started looking at that there's got to be something else out there, right, there's got to be people who are able to travel who are able to earn money without having to go back to study something else that I don't like, and, and eventually, I ended up discovering this whole online thing. And now, I don't know, it's been six years that I've been like working online full time. But that's where I thought it was very interesting. My money thoughts from back in the day. And what I'm worth and what I deserve to be paid, like in quotation marks, I guess, they're still you know, they were very strong for agents. Like, if I felt like I had money over at the end of the month, I was like, Oh, this makes me feel very uncomfortable. Because you know, usually it's just all 00, every single thing that comes in has a purpose, before it goes out. And I it took me so long to feel okay about having more money or about charging more than my hourly rate used to be and all of those things, it was very, very, very difficult. Did you have any thoughts around money in a similar way? Well, you know, we all have stories about money. And I think that working in a nonprofit, and then opening my childcare programme wasn't necessarily the cause of my thoughts as much as the result of my thoughts. And what I mean by that is, I grew up with this idea that, you know, you could either do good in the world, or you could make money, you know, that there was no right common ground between those two. And, of course, that's not true, you can do good in the world and make money. But it took me a long time to get to that. So I don't think I experienced guilt, as much as Oh, that's just not for me. You know, thinking about money isn't for me, making a lot of money isn't for me, we'll do fine, we'll get by, I was always able to provide for my children. We didn't take fancy vacations. But we took vacations, I was always very frugal. And, you know, I didn't think about money really, in the way I should. And that actually leads me to what I'm doing currently, which is ironically, financial coaching. And how that came about was all of those years of not paying attention to my money and saying later, later, later, and oh, I'll learn about investing later. I'll learn about saving later. Right now I have retirement is a long way away. Like I'll think about that later. Exactly. And, you know, I just kept putting it off. And all I really felt like I had the bandwidth for was my business and my kids. And again, that's a story, it wouldn't have taken that much effort to just put aside a little money every month to invest a little money every month. But I didn't. And it wasn't until my kids got older, and a little bit of space opened up in my life. And I started looking at my finances because I had gotten myself into some debt in the United States. We have IRAs retirement accounts, I had a very small amount that I every once in a while would put something into but nothing in a sustained way. And I finally did a reckoning and said this is not good. And I really have to start learning about this. And once I started learning, I got interested. And it was just who knew that personal finance could be so fascinating. And I that's me. And I did a really deep dive I read every book that I listened to every podcast, I read every blog, I took courses, and I started transforming my own financial life now, I'm still a work in progress. So, you know, I still have a ways to go but when the pandemic happened, and I closed my preschool with the intention that three weeks later, I'll open up again. Of course we all had that of course. Yeah. And that didn't happen. You know that was, as we all know, the pandemic went on and on. And as I was at home with my kids, one of the Silver Linings for me with the pandemic was that my young adult children were home with me, and they wouldn't otherwise have been. But another silver lining was that I started doing what for a year or two had been a little bug in the back of my mind at this little side hustle doing financial coaching, and I just never got around to it with the preschool demands, from early to late. And always somebody is sick and some problem that needs to be fixed. It's it's hard. And I met on the phone at night with a parent, and we're, you know, doing conferences, and we're doing assessments and you know, all of that it takes a lot. So here I was, and I said, Ah, this is a great opportunity, you know, I can actually start this thing. So, here I am, that's what I did. No, I think that's really amazing. Because so many times we think that we can't get around to doing something because, you know, you just don't have the time or it's not often the time actually, I find that I am out of out of energy, I guess at night like to do that like extra thing, because I have like so many different things that I already care about. And I'm trying to pay attention to all of them. And it makes it quite difficult, because there's just not another thing that I can sort of put on top of it. And sometimes it's hard to let something go. And generally you wouldn't. If you've put that amount of effort into running a business for that length of time, it's very hard to let it go. Yeah, so maybe in this case, it was fortunate to sort of be forced to let it go because it made the space that you needed available to go and actually build something else up, which I think is going to be way easier on you. Yeah, long term, way more fun, way more impact. Yeah. Sometimes when you're forced into something, you just do what you have to do. And that's what I did. And, you know, this is where I want to be. So yeah, so it all worked out in the end. I mean, I loved the preschool. I love the kids. I miss the kids. But yeah, I did for 18 years. And I was ready. Yeah, I have to say that I do miss the days when things have gone really well. And the kind of cosy atmosphere and those things like especially when it's a rainy day outside, I used to think of how we used to lay down and read books together. Yes, it was very fun. But then also, I know that long term, as much as it's fun just there in them. Right? It's just long term, not quite thing that's going to build you that freedom. Yeah, in particular. Yes. So your podcast is called finance your dream? Yeah. Which I think is very interesting. How did you pick the name? Okay. So this actually gets into one of the big issues that I'm having with my podcast, which I'm happy to talk about. And that is that, as a single mom, my heart lies with the single mom community. And I started the podcast with a different name. The name was money, parenting and life for single moms. And I had many, many episodes all outlined, I knew exactly who I was talking to, I knew exactly what I wanted to talk about, I really wanted to talk about money and single parenting. And because I'm who I am, I wanted to talk a little bit about parenting too, because that's just you know, who I am. And the podcast was growing, my audience was growing. And then I started working with a business coach. And she was wonderful and taught me many things. One of the thing she suggested was not necessarily to broaden the audience of my podcast, but to not talk just to single moms, to figure out what's the problem people are having and talk to the problem. And so, you know, I thought about that a lot. And I thought that the problem that I had and that a lot of people have is that you have a dream for something for me in my 30s it was I want to be a parent and here I am at the end of a long term relationship, and how am I going to do this financially? And for other people, it may be travelling or it may be starting a business or it may be whatever. And so the problem is you have this dream, how do you make the money work? How can you live creatively? How can you live differently than the way you've been taught that you should live in order to make that dream come true? So I changed the name. I started speaking more broadly. And in that process, I feel like I lost my voice a little bit. And I did a lot of soul searching and decided that that's a great idea. But the people who really want to speak to on the podcast, are single moms and other people who may be interested in what I'm talking about, but primarily to single moms, I get the dilemmas, I, you know, understand the situations. And so I have a few more episodes that are going to be aired that have already been recorded, that are a little bit more broad. And then I'm going to move back to focusing on single moms, I think I'm going to keep the name and maybe add a tagline. Because it is about financing your dream, whatever your dream may be for yourself and your kids. Yeah, I find that a very interesting thing. Because for me, like I love to work with expert based businesses, because those are the people that I know the people who know something really, really, really well be it because of their professional because of their passion for something. And that's what they want to speak about. And the one thing that I think is very important is that you know who you're talking to, yes, because there are so many podcasters out there, I could try and help. But I don't know how to help you, if you just want to be like I don't know, my pet hate for Joe Rogan will come out. But if you want to be the next Joe Rogan just talking about stuff and having a drink with your mates, and whatever, that's cool, but that's not what I can help you with, because I don't listen to that stuff. And it's just not my thing. So, for me, it was really important to speak to expert based businesses, because I think lots of people have so much value to give and no platform to do. So that's really working for them. And that's why I think podcasting can be, you know, so amazing. So I totally agree that if you feel that the group that you're speaking to is so clear to you. Because you've been in those exact places you have all the experiences that you can refer to your message is always going to be so much clearer because you know exactly what it feels like. And yes, the longer time passes, the more you will detach, and you will forget some things, but it just takes, I don't know one of the listeners to share one of their stories and you're like, oh my god, I remember that time where that happened to me like I've actually been in that situation. I've just forgotten about it. Yes. So I 100% think that it's probably going to be the right decision, particularly if you're feeling like you're not speaking to the people that you're wanting to speak to, because you have I mean but vague. Well, it's not so much that I'm not speaking to the people I want to speak with in my business, I don't work exclusively with single moms, I work with anybody who needs help with their day to day personal finances. And, you know, looking at some of those money mindset stories we talked about earlier, and budgeting and saving and figuring out what their goals are and making a plan to achieve those goals. And I have clients who are, you know, male, female, younger, older. But with the podcast, I mean, the podcast Originally, the idea was as a vehicle to get my name out there and to attract clients more than the podcast itself being a moneymaker. And it has done that to some extent, but there's just something telling me I need to be speaking to single women. And I do see as a possibility in the future doing some kind of, you know, single mom membership programme, or course or something that speaks specifically to the issues facing single moms. Yeah, 100%. I think where that passion lies, it's where you've got to follow. And I think that's something if we all did more of that, more of the things that we want to do and that we feel so strongly about, like I was watching made the other day, I just kind of got sucked into watching it because everyone was watching it. Yeah. And I was like, this is like the prime example. I've spoken to so many parents and that very exact situation. And I had to be the person in the miserable office when the parent comes in is like I need help to say there is nothing that we can offer I can send you to these people who probably will also have nothing to offer because you have a roof over your head or because of this or because of that. And if there's something that you find is close to your heart, taking a step in that direction is never going to be the wrong choice because the fire is there to do something. I agree and I will absolutely follow that. Hey, are you spending hours extra editing every other week because you forgot to do things like switching off your aircon or moving the dog outside of the house? Did you secure an amazing guest interview only to then forget to press record? Or maybe your guest forgot to press record and now you have to work with a really low quality backup Recording, do you want to batch your show and finally get ahead, but you can't for the life of you remember what's already done and what's not, don't worry, this is really normal. There are way more steps involved in running a successful high quality podcast than meets the eye. And it's really easy to forget something here and there. But let's be realistic. If you really want to grow your show, you can't carry on like this. If you want to design a podcasting workflow that works, then grab our podcast workflow blueprint. Now, you'll get immediate access to our entire podcast workflow that we've been using with all of our clients for months. The Blueprint contains a video training that explains exactly how our system works, the Trello board template that you can just plug into your account or transfer to your platform of choice, the fully customizable template episode workflows, guest email swipes, and as a bonus, the guest booking automation video training, you can check it all out and get your copy at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. And now back to the episode. What made you go with podcasting as a medium? Why not do YouTube? Why not? Blogging? Why not, you know, pretty much anything else that you could go down. I have written a couple of blogs before, and I enjoy doing it. But it took me freakin forever, you know, to write a blog post, maybe it brings out my perfectionist qualities, but especially if the post involved some research hours, you know, I listened to these people who say, Oh, it takes me an hour to write a blog post. I'm like, really? How do you do that? Because it would take me so long to write a blog post, it was a big part of my life getting a blog post out every week, I love to write. And I really love to edit when something's written because that's a lot easier than actually writing it in the first place. And I liked writing the blog. And you know, who knows, I might go back to it at some point. But it just took me such a long time. And I thought with podcasting, I knew that there was going to be time involved with editing and all of that, because I'm not at the point where I can hire somebody to, you know, do all of that for me. But I can outline something rather than write out a whole thing, and then sit and talk, or I can interview somebody, and it's fun. And I find I'm looking forward to it rather than saying, Ah, you know, I have to get a post out. And, you know, I'm actually probably spending almost as much time between the outlining the actual recording and the editing and the getting it out there as I was with the blog post, but for some reason it doesn't feel as heavy. That heavy being I think the word because that's what I feel like when I have to. I think for me blog posts are still okay, but they do take me longer than recording an episode for sure. But yeah, it's when I have to write the social media posts. I'm like, Oh, I'll say I don't really enjoy this, like, yeah, it feels so taken out of context. And you can't really add the things that you want to add because now you're over the character. So I've kind of said half the things and I'm like, Really, this doesn't belong here. This needs to be its own thing. So definitely, I can understand that heaviness, feeling and I always say I have too many bad hair days to pull off YouTube regularly because I just don't want to record I'm like, I'm sorry, mindfully aware. I mean, the people can't see us after we've published this because there isn't going to be a video version of it. But you know, I'm, I'm always mindfully aware if I need to go and get my hair coloured, and I'm like, No, I don't want to do a video today. So I have to get my hair coloured. And today, I look like this. And I just, I don't know, I'm not obsessed and I can go out without wearing makeup and things like that. I don't care about that part. But I don't like YouTube regularly. I just I can't so for me, it was like the happy medium. Right? And it's funny because my daughters who are now 18 and 23 Particularly my younger daughter is so comfortable in front of a camera. You know, she's grown up with taking pictures and sending them to friends of like silly things she's done and she doesn't care if she looks goofy or you know, whatever. It's just, it's what she's grown up with. I didn't grow up in that culture and I'm a little bit camera shy. I occasionally do a Facebook Live or an Instagram live but I'm getting more and more comfortable being on camera kind of letting my hair down and being myself rather than that whole perfectionist thing where you know, it has to be perfect for one reason or another. But podcasting just feels right to me, you know, it feels like that perfect combination of being able to get my thoughts and ideas out there so that I can help people without having to have my face on camera, Although who knows in the future may be at some point I'll do too. But I at this point, I doubt it. But who knows? And without having to, you know, write every week? Yeah, that makes sense. That's I totally agree with that. Yeah. How long did it take you from when you first thought, hey, I could do a podcast, actually getting it out there. I always find there's like a huge range when people start thinking about it. And when something actually happened. So did you find that there was a delay? Or was it more like, right, I'm doing this. I think I like most things in my life, I think about them for a long time before I execute. So I thought about having kids for a long time before I actually went and adopted my kids. I, you know, thought about opening my preschool for a long time before I actually quit my job and did it. And I thought about financial coaching for a long time before I actually did it. So that's sort of my modus operandi. You know, I think about things for a while. So I had been thinking about a podcast for quite a while I didn't have anything formulated, or, you know, I just said, I'd like to do a podcast. And so I actually stopped writing my blog. And again, I may go back to what people still look at it. It's a blog focused on people over the age of 50, who were interested in financial independence. And you know, what people can do if they're starting late. And I started a Facebook group around that, and it's grown now to like, 4000. Members. And, you know, so there's interest there. And I may eventually go back to that in some form. But I wanted again, that single mom thing was pulling me and I wanted to do something around sort of the three things that are the biggest poles in my life, which is single parenting, personal finance, and parenting, you know, so those are the things that had me started. So I'd say, when I really started thinking seriously about it to execution, maybe three or four months. That's not too bad. Yeah, not thinking about it for a long time before that, but then getting serious about it. It was about three or four months, because I had a big learning curve. I knew nothing, you know, and I didn't take a course I just Googled how to do, how to do podcast, I Googled how to use Audacity. What are the settings that I should use Audacity to make good sound good, what should I do to increase sound quality? You know, I Googled all of that. So I had a big learning curve. I practised on Audacity, and, you know, made some recordings and did some silly interviews with my kids. And, you know, all of that. And then finally, I felt like I was ready. Was there anything you felt very, like, particularly, I don't know, apprehensive off before you started? Was there any one thing where you're like, Oh, I put this off, like to the last minute kind of thing. I think it was marketing. I mean, marketing, social media. Marketing is still a big kind of bugaboo for me. I love doing the podcast. And I'm still learning how to get the word out there and how to market it and where to show up. And we're to tell people about it. Yeah, there's like a huge learning curve at the beginning. And that stops a lot of people who feel like, oh, you know, I have to figure these things out about the mic and the recording and the editing. And I don't really know how to do that. And that's like, one hate, yes. But then the other group, I think, gets to the point where they've got that figured out, and then the episodes are coming out, but then it's like, oh, right now how do I get people to actually listen to it? And I think that is where particularly if you don't love social media, yes. It's kind of a thing where you're like, oh, I have to kind of keep showing up there. And, and I think that's something that definitely we need to speak to like, way way, way, way, way more in the upcoming episodes, because that just takes a long time. I would love to listen to those episodes was like, I can still use the help. Oh, same like if I mean I guess we've been doing marketing with clients and things for like six years but when it's your own things, it's actually easier to market your clients things and as to market your own because your own you always have that thing of like what but what if it's not quite good enough? Yeah. And what if people are not gonna like this thing? And that that doesn't go when it's your own? Whereas if it's someone else's, I know how good it is. But it's not mine. Some kind of like removed? Yes. How did you feel before release in the first episode, scared sort of like, I'm actually out there people might actually listen Listen to this and, and people did, you know and I got some good feedback and kept going. So yeah, but I was apprehensive, putting that first one out there. But you know, I had this little mantra that I kept telling myself, which was, you know, good enough, it doesn't have to be perfect, you know, sound quality, as long as it doesn't sound tinny and super amateurish, then good enough, I'll improve as I go along. My main concern was always content, I wanted to have really excellent content, I really wanted to, you know, get information and stories out there that would help people and that people would want to listen to so. And I think content over sound quality, like any day, so maybe it's just the group of perfectionist who's like, right, like, it has to be like the best that it can be. Otherwise, we're not going to be happy about it. But I think if the contents amazing, and if you're sharing so much value, that the listeners are picking up things that they can go and take away and make improvements on their lives, like immediately, like every episode, they're picking up one thing and implementing it and making their lives a little bit better and picking up another thing and making their lives a little bit better. You're going to be the go to expert, even if you don't have the top mic, and even if you can't afford to invest, I don't know how much into your environment. Like it's just getting started. And not telling yourself that I can't do this because I can't do this because I can't do this. Because it's like the hardest part. Yeah. Yeah. Was there a point where you thought, well, I feel more comfortable with this now? Like, it's just it becomes like an everyday thing. I'm just doing this podcast? Yeah, I don't think that there was one moment I can point to, but like, anything you do in life, the more you do it, the more you learn and know and the easier it becomes. And I have committed to consistency. There was one week, I missed. And I felt so badly about that. Just because, you know, I was moving my daughter to San Francisco, and I hadn't batched the way I should have. And, you know, I just couldn't do it that week. But other than that, I've been consistent. And I'm proud of that, you know, that I've just been pumping and episodes out there. And I think consistency is really important. So yeah, and it's a big struggle. Like I'm not a naturally consistent person. I like to put in like a burst of energy. And then I like to not touch it for a while. So yeah, I have to use batching. I don't think it's the should some people are really good at just consistently every Tuesday between 10 and 11 to be in the mood to record. And every Wednesday, they're in the mood to be editing. And every Thursday, they're in the mood to write the copy to promo it. I'm not. Yeah, I'm in the mood for recording for like eight hours straight. Yep. Then I legit don't want to be recording for a very long time. Because I just I've said what I needed to say? Yes. So I don't know batching. To me, it's not an option. It's more like an if I want to get it done, the only way is actually going to be to batch it. Because it's not gonna it's not going to happen. Well, batching definitely makes it so much easier. You know, with that when I have three or four episodes that I record in one week. And then I don't have to worry about it for a little while. It just It does open space up and it makes things easier. Yeah. And then it gives you more time to promo as well, because that's what takes the most energy to keep showing up. And yes, when you feel like you're chasing your tail, you don't really pay as much attention to the promotion. Because you know, like, I have to get to the next one because they haven't done that yet. Yeah. And that's when I find my top excuse to like, not go and promo or something. Yes, because I feel like I'm late. And I should be doing the next recording part and not be here on social media telling people about it. And actually, it's all important. Not just that one thing. Yes, for sure. I have a specific question. And that is, I've noticed a lot of the people that we've worked with, that are new to I don't want to say running businesses because not all of them run a business, but the podcast kind of is a business for some of them. Yeah. Oh, they want it to be in any case. Lots of people struggle with the idea of asking for money when it comes to producing content, because they're like, Well, I do the podcast and the podcast is free. And I feel bad to ask them to buy this thing that I made or I feel bad to ask them to donate or to sign up to my Patreon, although I am going to be giving them lots of value but I feel bad for doing them. Yes. Is there anything that you can share that might help to shift that mindset around being paid for something thing that you do that's actually very valuable to other people who would be very happy to pay you. Yeah, they don't have a problem with it. The problem seems to be like with them. Yeah. I mean, I would say I empathise, and I understand that hesitation. And, you know, as I said, I hadn't conceived of my podcast as a moneymaker in and of itself. I was using it more to have people know about me and to attract potential clients. And it has done that to some extent, I mean, not to the extent yet that I would like it to. But more and more, I think, as you do what you do, and you get feedback from what you do, you feel stronger in the value that you're providing. So as a total newbie, financial coach, I was really worried about, you know, what do I charge people, and should I even be charging people because I'm new to this, and all of that. And as time has gone by, and I have seen the really sometimes unbelievable changes people have made in their lives and the benefits to them. I'm like, wow, these services are really valuable. And I have a much less of an issue. Now. Even I recently raised my prices. And because I just know, the value that I can provide, it often pays back like tenfold, you know, there's no doubt about it. That's what I might like the people often perfectly happy to pay for it. Right? So I would say, once you are out there a little bit, and you're starting to get some feedback, use that feedback, you know, use those, those comments that you're getting, and, you know, wow, this was really helpful. And, you know, I really liked this, and I'm starting to do some of these things that you're suggesting. And, and when you start hearing things like that, you can build up your confidence so that whether it's a product you're trying to sell, I mean, I am eventually going to be selling some products through my podcast. I'm not doing it yet, but I'm working on creating some of them. And, you know, as I said before, possibly not sure exactly how it's going to pan out, but possibly a membership site for single moms, where there'll be discussion, community resources, forces, horses, all sorts of things. But it can't hurt to try. Just try you know, on a on a small scale, see how it goes. And if it doesn't work, don't take that as Oh, this will never work, try something else. And just keep, you know, keep going until you hit what connects with your audience and makes people dying to buy something from you. Yeah, and I think that's so that community aspect is so important. And I think if we shift our focus a little bit from just marketing, which is a bit like talking at people, to having it be talking to people and building actual, genuine relationships somewhere, exactly, it makes it feel less like you're just going Hello, listen to my stuff below listen to. And it's actually like, Hey, this is very valuable for you. You might want to, you know, check that out. But then also like, asking people actual questions about themselves without the intent of necessarily wanting to like, I don't know, you know, when someone's talking to you, and they just want to sell you something. So I am not really interested in that. But I mean, like genuinely finding out about those people. And then you start generating those conversations when people have the chance to give you that feedback. And then suddenly they go, Oh, my God, I can listen to this and listen to that. I didn't know you were so right. And I made this change, and then you'll see the value. But if you're just like podcasting in your isolated bubble, and you're not interacting with people, you can get that feedback. Right. And I think that's that's really a super, super, super good point. Yeah. So we are already somehow coming to the end of the time that I'd booked in for the interview, right, which almost makes me think that I should maybe plan more time. There's so many interesting people to talk to, like, I don't know, I love who we're getting to meet just through the work and things like great, isn't it great. You get to meet so many interesting and fantastic people by interviewing them. Yeah, I know international people. It's a great community. I really that's one thing I've really liked about doing things like podcasting or working online is like I've never met so many people from so many different places will do so many interesting things and I want To know about all of them. So, if people are listening, and they're thinking, Okay, where do I find out more? I think there's going to be a lot of people who will be very interested, particularly if you're also going down the community building route. Because I really think that that's a group that often gets pushed out a huge amount where it's like, oh, well, you know, it's a bit, I guess it's a lot of shame and guilt still around. And that's where I think community is so important to like, have that be eradicated. So where can people find out more about you? And also, I would really like to see that launch. I think it's important to you. Yeah. So first of all, you could listen to my podcast, which is called finance your dream, and you can search for it on iTunes, or Spotify or wherever you listen. Yeah, wherever you listen, you can go to my website, which is Money Smart for life.com. Um, and I do have a Facebook group, that's a private group, but is, you know, not a paid group. So you can look for it on Facebook, if you're a single mom. And it's called Money, parenting and life for single moms. So that's another place that you can find me or my facebook page Money Smart for Life. Awesome, I'll ask you to drop the link to the group. And again, and then I'll put that all in the show notes so that everyone can just go down to the shownotes. And excellent and find you and get the community that they need. Because I think it really does matter. Thank you. Any one tip that you would give someone along their journey, something maybe someone shared with you or something you've read somewhere that's maybe become like a bit of a mantra, or that could well, I'm just going to repeat what I said earlier, which is good enough, is good enough. You know, it's it doesn't have to be perfect. It doesn't have to sound like you're on National Public Radio, or you know, where they have a team of, you know, many, many people working to make it sound perfect. Just get good content out there. You know, focus on your content, make it sound as good as you can, given your resources and you know, Google how to do it, and just go for it. Yeah. Thank you so much for doing this interview today. I really, really, really appreciated. Your welcome. It was pleasure. That's really fun. Thank you for having me. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye. That's it for this episode. Thank you so much for listening. We really appreciate you. If you're ready to step out of overwhelm. Then don't forget to check out the podcast workflow blueprint at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. The link is also in the show notes Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert. Personal Finance Expert

Rate, Review and Follow on Apple Podcasts

“I love Jess and Podcasting for Experts.” – If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing my show! This helps me support more people — just like you — create a show to move toward the podcasting life and business that they desire. Click here, scroll to the bottom, tap to rate with five stars, and select “Write a Review.” Then be sure to let me know what you loved most about the episode! Also, if you haven’t done so already, subscribe to the podcast. I’m adding a bunch of bonus tips to the feed and, if you’re not subscribed, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out. Subscribe now!

podcast directories checklist

Episode 5 – Your perfect podcasting team

Episode Description This episode is all about building your perfect podcast team - and even if you...

Episode 4 – Interview with Podcaster Marie Gettel-Gilmartin

Episode Description In this episode of the show I am excited to speak to Marie Gettel-Gilmartin....

Episode 3 – The best podcasting tools for organisation

Episode Description There are lots of aspects to the podcasting process that can take more time or...

Episode 1 – How to create your perfect Podcasting Workflow

Episode Description Welcome back to season 2! I'm so excited for everything we're going to dive...

Episode 12 – How to Grow your Business with your Podcast

Episode Description In this episode we are talking about how to grow your business with your...

Episode 11 – How to Structure your Podcast

Episode Description Behind every good podcast lies an intention. It might be to educate, to amuse,...

Episode 10 – Best Recording Equipment for Podcasting

Episode Description There is a lot of advice out there about what recording equipment is needed to...

Episode 9 – What your Podcast Cover needs!

Episode Description Today we're going to be talking about Podcast Artwork. It's one of those...

Episode 8 – How long should a podcast episode be?

Episode Description Another one of those questions that keeps resurfacing is "is there an ideal...

Episode 7 – How to write a good Podcast Description

Episode Description So far we have talked about how to setup, get people interested and plan your...