podcasting workflow

Episode Description

Welcome back to season 2! I’m so excited for everything we’re going to dive into in this season. Our main focus  in this season will be organising the backend of your podcast so that you’re on top of your show every single week.

Today we’re starting with talking about your podcasting workflow, what is a workflow, why is it important and how do you come up with one.

You're listening to podcasting for experts with honest conversations about using podcasting as a tool to grow your reach, increase your audience, make a positive impact on the world, and most importantly, to get paid for your efforts. I'm your host, Jess, and we are pristine podcasts. Let's talk podcasting. Hey, everyone, and welcome back to Season Two of podcasting for experts. In this season, we will mostly be talking about the back end of your podcast. So we're going to talk about organisational things, we're going to talk about tools, we're going to talk about systems, we're gonna talk about processes. And we're basically gonna talk about how you can get the ship in order. So to say, we're also introducing our first guest interviews to the show and this season. And I am super excited, because I've already chatted to some really interesting people with really, really interesting backstories. And I can't wait to share those with you. So the Tuesday's show will continue to always be content in line with whatever the topic is that we're covering in that season. And the Thursday episode, going forward, will always be an interview. Alright, so you kind of are going to get the balance of both. Okay, enough about that. Today, I want to get started with talking about your podcasting workflow. So organising your podcast is super, super, super important if you actually want to get the most out of your show, and honestly, not completely lose your head in the process. Doing your show every single week without a proper workflow in place is a little bit like running a bakery. But everything in the bakery is made without a single recipe. So imagine you're going into that bakery, and the strawberry cake that you buy ends up having peaches in it instead of strawberries. The bread that you took along isn't actually quite finished yet. And there are chocolate muffins for sale, but no one put them on the display. So now they are legit the best kept secret. Would you like to shop at a bakery like that? I would assume? No. So let's try not to run our podcast in the same way as we're running our fictional bakery. As with pretty much everything in life, it's normal that when you first get started, you really have no clue what you're actually doing there. So when you're starting your podcast, you get started with doing the obvious tasks like recording your show and editing your show, publishing your show. And slowly, slowly, slowly, you add more and more things to your mental list of to dues. And then what usually happens at some point is that something somewhere slowly starts slipping a little bit. One week, you forget to turn the aircon off. And now you have this annoying background noise to remove from your recording. Another week you forget to hit record on the guest interview and you end up either needing to re record the whole thing, or you have to use the lesser quality backup recording. The following week, you completely forgot to promote your episode on one of your main social media accounts. So it's hardly getting any downloads. And so it continues week on week. So if you don't develop a workflow for your podcast, you are running the risk of not publishing your episodes according to your schedule. Because you know, things can happen that throw you off track really early on in the process, like for example having to re record a guest interview and then you can't meet your publishing deadlines anymore. Also, if you don't have a workflow, it means that you're not really being very efficient, either because you constantly need to correct errors, or because you're just not doing things in an order that is actually logical. And that works for you. An example for that is, let's say you get to the point of being ready to publish your episode. But then you realise that you don't have the graphics that you need to actually publish the episode. So you go you're open Canva, Photoshop, whatever you're using to make the graphics. And then you make the graphic, you download it and you have to come back to it. Then next, you realise that you don't actually have the tracking links for your show notes. So therefore, you now got to go and first make the tracking links before you can put the show notes into your podcast host and that's how you end up going back and forth, back and forth, back and forth. And it requires your brain do an awful lot of what's called task switching. And that wastes brain capacity and it wastes time. Another thing that you can't really do when you don't have a proper workflow for your podcast is that it's really difficult to start batching, because you would completely lose your head in the mess of having multiple episodes on the go at the same time. So you will end up with one episode that's edited, but didn't have the graphics created. And then you want to publish it, and you're missing bits. And you're just amplifying the problem from the last point that when you're not efficient, and you don't have a process, and you're not tracking your progress, it is super difficult to do multiple episodes at the same time, because there's just no way for you to remember what you actually did for which episode, you also run a really high risk of making a negative impression on potential guests for your show. Because if you're super unorganised, and you just don't send the things that they need on time, it makes it overall a very painful experience for someone to be a guest on your podcast. So if I've applied to be a guest, and then you kind of take a month to get back to me, and then you tell me that you need me to send you three things, and I send you those three things. And then two weeks later, you tell me that you need another two things. And then we're finally getting around to go back and forth on when we're going to do the interview and, and the whole thing is just super wishy washy, it doesn't make me very likely to enjoy the experience as a guest. And it also doesn't make me very likely to want to promote your show, or to send other guests your way out of my network, because I just didn't have a very good experience with it. It would also cause huge chaos and delays when you're thinking of bringing on team members. Because you're not actually clear on what needs to get done by when and to what standard that should be done. And then you run the risk of your podcast actually stopping completely once a life starts getting in the way and that's your usual family emergencies, you know, births, deaths, the usual things. If you still have a full time job, or you have a business that you're growing, it becomes really difficult to keep on track with your podcast if you don't actually have any fixed deadlines for anything. And that is what mostly causes pod feed. And we talked about this in previous episodes how important the organisation is to prevent your podcast from just fading out because you're not you skip one week, and then you put out an episode and then you skip another week, and then it becomes once a month and then you just kind of stop doing your show entirely. And the main reason for that, in my opinion has been a workflow organisational thing or overestimating the time that you have available. So what stops people from getting started with developing their own podcast or workflow, I have heard like a bazillion excuses. And the majority of them, they don't even make any sense. So I'm know that your brain is really amazing. Just like I know that my brain is really amazing. But our brains are really good at long term storage of stuff that we don't actually need. And we don't even remember that we remember it somewhere. It is also really good at having some working memory for us to be you know, working creatively on projects. However, what it doesn't tend to be so good at is that short to mid term storage when we're like okay, so for this episode, I need to do these five things. And my job requires me to do this. And my partner asked me to pick up ABC from the dry cleaners on Thursday. And that kind of stuff. Our brain isn't designed to store that kind of information in our head. And that's why we write to do lists. That's why we set reminders and designing a podcasting workflow and documenting all of the things that you need to get done in that workflow in a place that is not inside your head, is something that's actually quite essential if you want to keep your levels of creativity up. And if you want to focus your brain on doing what it does best. Another excuse that I hear a lot is people say that they don't have any time. Right? So other than I keep it all in my head, I don't need this kind of stuff. I don't have any time is like one of the top reasons. The thing is, I don't think you have any time not to do this. So I know that setting up your podcasting workflow and putting it in an online tool and writing out all of those checklists. I know that it's gonna take you a few hours to do that. But the thing is, if you don't spend those few hours and now what's going to happen is that you're going to waste 10 times the amount of hours that it's going to take you to set up the system over the next few weeks. because you're going to keep forgetting things, it's just natural as your to do list gets longer and longer and longer, you are going to keep forgetting things. And then instead of an edit for an episode, taking two hours, the Edit now takes eight hours because the file is badly messed up, and you can't re record it. So in those six hours that you spent editing one episode, what you could have done is you could have set up the system to make sure you're not in that position in the first place. Right? If you keep forgetting to promote your episodes, and you're not showing up on social media, and you're kind of half assing, the whole thing, you end up with way less progress for the growth of your show. But if you have a business attached to it, also for the growth of your business, so can you afford to lose three months, six months, nine months, 12 months, because you're just progressing? So slowly? I don't think you realistically can waste that time or want to waste that time. So I don't have any time is an excuse that doesn't make any sense. What you're saying is I don't see the need to make any time for that. And that's what we're going to be talking about today. Something else that I know holds people back is they just don't know what a workflow should look like and how detailed it should be. And something else that comes up a lot is that people I'm not sure what to use to actually document the workflow so that it's usable for themselves and their team members. Alright, so those are like natural things that will stop you from implementing this. Hey, are you spending hours extra editing every other week? Because you forgot to do things like switching off your aircon or moving the dog outside of the house? Did you secure an amazing guest interview only to then forget to press record? Or maybe your guest forgot to press record. And now you have to work with a really low quality backup recording? Do you want to batch your show and finally get ahead but you can't for the life of you remember what's already done and what's not, don't worry, this is really normal. There are way more steps involved in running a successful high quality podcast than meets the eye. And it's really easy to forget something here and there. But let's be realistic. If you really want to grow your show, you can't carry on like this. If you want to design a podcasting workflow that works, then grab a podcast workflow blueprint now, you'll get immediate access to our entire podcast workflow that we've been using with all of our clients for months. The Blueprint contains a video training that explains exactly how our system works, the Trello board template that you can just plug into your account or transfer to your platform of choice, the fully customizable template episode workflows, guest email swipes. And as a bonus, the guest booking automation video training, you can check it all out and get your copy at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. And now back to the episode. So let's talk about what exactly is a workflow and how does one actually create one. So your podcast is basically a really repetitive routine task either by itself or within your business. So if you're doing a task regularly and repeatedly, you want to be sure that there's a very, very clear process for completing this task. And this process is called a standard operating procedure. And you'll usually see it abbreviated with SOP, having an SOP simply ensures that the process is done as efficiently as possible and without any errors. So you want to be sure that your SOPs include what needs to be done, who is going to do it. And when it needs to be done by as well as the how I do want to say here that if you have a team in place to help you manage your podcast, it doesn't have to be you that is responsible for defining the how so don't think that you have to carry the full responsibility. If you have your podcast Manager, you can fully integrate them into this process or even better give them the responsibility for designing and maintaining this process so that it's one less thing on your to do list. For me, there are really two aspects to designing your workflow. One is kind of the bird's eye macro view. And the other one is the very detailed step by step list part. When you're coming up with your workflow, the first thing that you want to do is I just you know, I recommend you get a big piece of paper, you just dump everything on that piece of paper. I love to use the kind of mind map layout for this where the first bubble away from the centre is the stage of the process. And then all lines coming off of the stage of the process are the actual action steps and then those are broken down into even smaller and more specific action steps. So first, take a piece of paper and dump the general stages of your workflow and then the general things that you do within that stage onto a piece of paper. So you stop having it in your head, and you can see it all in front of you. The next big thing that I tend to do is I tend to number through them, so that you end up with the correct order in which those steps should be done. And then what you're going to want to do is document all of that in some sort of online tool, okay, this will save you a tonne of headache in the future, because this tool is accessible from any browser, on desktop or on mobile. So you can quickly look up the status of any episode if needed. And if you're planning to get a team on board in future, then now is the time to lay the foundations for that you have lots of options when it comes to setting up your system. In one of those online tools. There's literally a bazillion of them Trello, Monday, Asana, clickup, and more. Personally, we love Asana. That's the one that we use within our team because we have a lot of recurring tasks. And that is one of the strengths that it has. And if you're not so much reliant on having recurring tasks within your business as a whole, then the best option in my opinion, is Trello. We are going to have a separate episode coming up by the way where we're talking about our favourite tools for managing podcasts and the whole podcasting process. So keep an ear out literally for that episode, if you want to learn more about useful tools, there is an additional benefits to having a super clear podcast workflow in place. And that benefit is one I won't cover in detail today, because I am going to have a whole separate episode on this as well. And that is automation. Automation basically means finding tools that can automate repetitive parts of the process, or help you make certain aspects of the process go more smoothly. An example would be using a calendar tool to help you cut out this email back and forth with potential guests. And then you can integrate that tool with another tool to automatically send certain emails to your guests, etc, right. So you can't create automation, when you don't know what you need to be automating. So if you want to save yourself even more time, making the podcast workflow super clear and super linear is going to allow you to look at steps of the process where you could potentially automate it. So something that is really important when it comes to your systems. And that's not just for your podcast, but for businesses as a whole, is to make sure that you actually plan in time to review these systems regularly, your podcast and your business as a whole, they change. And it's important that you figure out ways to work better to work more efficiently to maybe incorporate new team members. And it's super easy for you to outgrow your workflow. So I would say initially, in the first three months, I would plan to review your podcasting workflow every single month. And after that, I would say probably once a quarter, you're going to want to check if that process still lines up. And if there are additional ways in which you can add automation into the process, you know, because there's lots of tools being developed all the time, that can save us a whole load of time. But if we don't set aside time to review that, we end up not knowing about it. So now that you know what a podcast workflow is, it's time to get your sorted out. As I already mentioned earlier, you can get the podcast or workflow blueprint where I give you the whole setup. And you can learn more about that at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. Or you can just have a go and doing it by yourself and then refining it as you go. So grab that piece of paper, start documenting and then don't forget to get it set up in the online tool of your choice. I would love for you to show me your work. I always am a bit of a systems efficiency geek. Maybe that's the German part in me. So I would love for you to show me your work, snap a picture, tag us at pristine podcasts on Instagram so that I can a have a look at it and be reshare it because I find it really interesting to see the different systems that people are developing. Alright, so that's it for this episode. If you enjoyed the show, our entire team would appreciate it if you leave us a review. And if you'd like to be a guest on the podcast, or if you would like to talk about collaborations, maybe doing a training together, then drop us an email you will find our email address in the show notes. And as always, I hope you have an amazing day and we'll see For the next one. That's it for this episode. Thank you so much for listening. We really appreciate you. If you're ready to step out of overwhelm, then don't forget to check out the podcast workflow blueprint at pristine podcast.com forward slash blueprint. The link is also in the show notes Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow. Podcasting Workflow.

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